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Stanford, California
Supporting the Study of History, Gender, and Science
Supporting the Study of History, Gender, and Science
Londa Schiebinger's book, The Mind Has No Sex? Women in the Origins of Modern Science was supported by an NEH research fellowship. Image courtesy of Harvard University Press.

Londa Schiebinger’s first book, The Mind Has No Sex? Women in the Origins of Modern Science (1989), documents that women were willing and ready to take their place in science in the seventh and eighteenth centuries, and how the restructuring of science and society in what historians identify as the Scientific Revolution led to their exclusion. Schiebinger’s book, which was supported in part by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, has been translated seven languages. Her work has had a longlasting impact on research policy at the U.S. National Institutes of Health and the European Commission, ensuring that scientists integrate sex and gender analysis into their research design.

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