Left Arrow no-results Right Arrow
Santa Fe, New Mexico
Bringing Award-Winning Exhibitions to the American Public
Pedro Antonio Fresquís (aka Truchas Master), Our Lady of St. John of the Lakes, New Mexico, early nineteenth century. Water-based pigments on cloth and wood, 11 x 7 ½ x 1 3/16 in. Museum of International Folk Art, Gift of the Historical Society of New Mexico. Image courtesy of the Museum of International Folk Art. Photograph by Addison Doty.

Pedro Antonio Fresquís (aka Truchas Master), Our Lady of St. John of the Lakes, New Mexico, early nineteenth century. Water-based pigments on cloth and wood, 11 x 7 ½ x 1 3/16 in. Museum of International Folk Art, Gift of the Historical Society of New Mexico. Image courtesy of the Museum of International Folk Art. Photograph by Addison Doty.

With funding from the NEH, the Museum of International Folk Art has been creating folk art exhibitions to share with the American public since 1987. Exhibitions on Turkish folk art, recycled art, Tibetan culture, Carnaval, and ceramics have travelled the country, introducing visitors to traditional arts and artisans. The museum’s most recent exhibition, “The Red that Colored the World” explores how the history of the color red, as made from the cochineal beetle, is as much a history of world trade and economics as it is a history of science and art. After premiering at the museum in Santa Fe, it traveled to the Bowers Museum in Santa Ana, California; the El Paso Museum of Art in El Paso, Texas; the Foosaner Art Museum in Melbourne, Florida; and the Louisiana Art and Science Museum in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

View By Location
Or View By Impact Area